History

 

Amos L. Avery (1831-1917) began his career as a storekeeper at an early age. He was only 23 years old when he began working at the Easthampton General Store. From there, he worked in the Bernardston, Massachusetts general store for 5 years. Following his marriage in Hawley, Massachusetts, Amos returned to his hometown of Charlemont, Massachusetts to go into business with Thomas Mayhew in a general store. An earlier general store existed in the 1850s under the name Mayhew & Avery.
Thomas Mayhew
Original owner/business partner or Amos L. Avery
In 1861, Amos and his brother, William bought out Mayhew, and formed W.B. & A.L. Avery. A few years later, in 1866, Amos bought out William’s share and formed A.L. Avery. A year later, Amos also bought the building that housed the store. ―The Baltimore, as it was known, was built by the Mayhew family.
Amos L. Avery
Owner/ business partner of Henry Mayhew
Amos would run the business as the sole proprietor until 1890, when his son Oscar would join him, resulting in the name change, A.L. Avery & Son. Amos died in 1917, leaving the business in the family, as Oscar’s son Henry L. Avery would join as a partner in 1927. The Avery General Store stayed in the same family for over 157 years, making it one of the oldest family run businesses in the country.
Oscar Avery
business partner and son of Amos Avery
A. L. Avery & Son was a fifth generation family-owned business with deep connections to the community in and around Charlemont, with the Previous owners Dennis Avery and Karen Hogness running the store for the last 42 years . Most recently Avery’s changed hands to new owners Jim and Barbra Sinclair in November of 2016. Barbara Sinclair grew up in Charlemont where Avery’s was an everyday part of life and Jim grew up in greenfield. Both understand the importance that this general store has had in the community for over 168 years.
“Our commitment is that we want to keep Avery’s as Avery’s” – Sinclairs
Avery’s is the true embodiment of a general store, with a meat counter, produce cooler, canned goods, hardware, housewares, clothing, shoes, building materials, and every day essentials.